When I saw this napkin with Paris and the date of 1878, I wondered why that might have some significance.  So I googled it and found that there was a world exposition or world's fair held in Paris in 1878. In France the event was called the "Exposition Universelle."   From there, I decided to create a fictitious story about a young lady of 16 and her older sister and father's trip to The Paris Exposition Universelle of 1878. (Notice the aged look. You will learn how to do this in the workshop.)

And I've begun a new art journal that has no theme but is a mish-mash of examples of free-flowing ideas and various techniques.   I have used die cuts, magazine clips, personal art, digital art (by license permission,) stamps, ink, embossing, color pencils, clay, markers, acrylic paint, etc.

Remember, an art journal; your journal, can be about anything you like and use a wide range of media and techniques.

Below is the journal cover that I decoupaged with several layers of Mod Podge.  I completed the journal cover before I did the napkin decoupaging.  Sometimes I think the napkin decoupage page should have been the cover.  Oh well.

My art journaling inspiration came from a napkin that I saw as I was shopping at Tuesday Morning.

My Art Journaling Process

I'm not sure what came first, the napkin at Tuesday Morning or the how-to video on YouTube about decoupaging with decorative napkins. But no matter.


The process of separating the three layers that a napkin is made of in order to decoupage (glue) the top printed layer on your project is kind of tedious, but it can be done and the results are beautiful. (You can also use tissue paper.)  And if you tear the very thin tissue to shreds, you have more napkins to try with again. So don't worry.  For this page, I used a rice glue that worked very well.

Below is an overview shot of most of the pages I've completed.  I will complete this journal soon and as I have a chance, I'll provide more info on techniques and how-to's.

I actually used 2 or 3 napkin layers to cover the page because the page was bigger than the napkin. It's hard to tell where the seams are.